20% off on Whistle FIT + a free leash

20% off on Whistle FIT + a free leash *

Smart Collars

Accessories

Discover more about your dog’s health data

In the Whistle app, you’ll find information on your pet’s overall wellness, scratching, licking, sleeping, eating, and drinking. We arrive at those insights by gathering your pet’s health data and comparing it to the behavioral data from Pet Insight Project. So, you can share health reports with your vet, prevent health problems, and uncover new ways to care.

Here’s some detail on how to understand those insights.

Scratching

Scratching

Scratching is the #1 reason people bring their pups to the vet.

While the occasional itch is fully normal, increased scratching is one of the strongest indicators of allergies or skin infections. Left untreated, skin conditions can lead to issues like dermatitis, infection, and lower quality of life. We determine what’s normal by comparing your dog’s scratching to dogs with healthy skin and dogs with skin conditions. So we can confidently say when it’s time for a checkup.

Understand scratching levels

Infrequent

Less than 52 seconds of daily scratching, 7 day average

Less scratching than 50%of other dogs

Infrequent scratching probably means your dog does not have an allergy or infection.

What to do: Just keep tracking and doing what you’re doing.

Occasional

Between 53 and 119 seconds of daily scratching, 7 day average

More scratching than the average dog.

Occasional scratching is an ambiguous indicator—your dog may have a skin problem or may just scratch a bit more than most other dogs. By keeping track of your pet’s history, you’ll probably know which of these it is.

What to do: Continue monitoring the behavior for any increase in frequency, which may be an early sign of dermatological issues.

Elevated

Between 120 and 299 seconds of scratching per day with a 7-day average

Scratches more than 85% of dogs.

Elevated scratching may be a symptom of skin issues like allergies and infections. It can also lead to skin damage.

What to do: Consider booking a skin checkup. You can share scratching data with the vet, straight from the app.

Severe

More than 300 seconds of daily scratching with a 7-day average.

More scratching than 97% of other dogs.

Severe scratching is almost always a sign of irritation. And it’s likely to cause more damage and discomfort.

What to do: Book a skin checkup if you can. You can share scratching data with the vet, straight from the app.

Worried about an elevated or severe level?

Look out for:

  • Red or irritated skin
  • Dry or discolored skin
  • Bumps or rashes
  • Matted hair

Spot something? Consider any changes that may have occurred in the past few days that could cause an issue. And keep monitoring their behavior, both with your smart device and your pet parent observational skills.

If the scratching stays at an elevated or severe level, connect with your vet.

Tip: It’s possible your smart device will misinterpret a “scratch-like” behavior. For instance, if you put your pup in a new sweater and they’re trying to paw it off, that may be logged as a scratch. So keep an eye out if you see a sudden change that doesn’t match your observations.

Your Stories

"The scratching and licking tracking feature of the Whistle FIT has been amazing. Shortly after getting it, it alerted us to him scratching at an elevated rate and it kept going up. We ended up finding that he has severe food allergies."

Shadow's Mom

“Whistle detected an abnormal amount of scratching on my 9 month old Samoyed, Ivan. The flea & tick medication actually burned his skin and we didn’t know, but Whistle did.”

Ivan's Mom

“We got an alert that his scratching was highly elevated so we thought we'd take him to the vet. It turned out he had a pretty bad ear infection! We would have never caught it without the Whistle notifications because he wasn't displaying any other symptoms.”

Leo's Mom

Licking

Licking

The average dog spends over 7 minutes licking themselves a day.

It happens for a whole slew of reasons: self-grooming, cleaning wounds, dealing with boredom, coping with stress, soothing skin, relieving joint pain, establishing social order, or just licking up some leftovers. Whatever the cause, your dog’s licking level can give you insight into their physical and mental well-being.

Note: Your smart device tracks when your dog licks themselves—not other pups, objects, people, or peanut butter.

Understand licking levels

Infrequent

Fewer than 7 minutes of daily licking with a 7-day average.

Less licking than 50% of other dogs.

Infrequent licking likely means your dog has a lower risk of skin infections and allergies.

What to do: Just keep tracking and doing what you’re doing.

Occasional

Between 8 and 19 minutes of daily licking with a 7-day average.

More licking than the average dog, but less than the top 85% of dogs with a higher rate of skin issues.

Occasional licking could point to a skin issue or may just mean your dog likes to lick more than most.

What to do: Keep tracking their licking for any changes or increases.

Elevated

Between 20 and 43 minutes of daily licking with a 7-day average

More licking than 85% of other dogs.

Elevated licking may be a symptom of skin issues like allergies and infections. It can also lead to skin damage.

What to do: Consider booking a skin checkup. You can share licking data with the vet, straight from the app.

Severe

More than 44 minutes of daily licking with a 7-day average

More licking than 97% of other dogs.

Severe licking is almost always a sign of irritation. And it’s likely to cause more damage and discomfort.

What to do: Book a skin checkup if you can. You can share licking data with the vet, straight from the app.

Worried about an elevated or severe level?

Keep monitoring their behavior, both with your smart device and your pet parent observational skills. Look out for skin irritation or redness. And check out their paws for any items that may be causing an issue. Licking may also be a sign of boredom or stress, so consider any changes that could be affecting your pup’s mental health too.

If the licking stays at an elevated or severe level, connect with your vet.

Your Stories

“The app had told me that Daisy was licking more. When I watched her, she seemed to be licking her paws. They were black in between her pads. So I took her to Vet. Found out she had a fungus, think athletes foot, in human terms.”

Daisy's Mom

“The Whistle really helps me keep track of how active Athena is on a daily basis. It tells me when she is licking too often and when she is very active. It helps so much! I love the Whistle!”

Athena's Mom

“Whistle let me know that Miko had increased licking. Then we discovered that he had developed a hot spot on his left front leg, hidden under his thick fur. Without Whistle, we would not have known he had an itchy spot until it was bad enough to see.”

Miko's Mom

DRINKING

DRINKING

Your dog’s drinking patterns can speak volumes about their health.

A dog’s drinking habits can change for a variety of reasons. Temperature and activity changes are both common variables that will affect a healthy dog’s drinking patterns. Changes can also occur in dogs with health issues. For example, dogs developing kidney disease or diabetes will exhibit an increase in water consumption. Age is another factor, with older dogs often being dehydrated. And food, yet another factor; dogs eating dry kibble often drink more water than dogs eating canned or wet food.

UNDERSTANDING DRINKING LEVELS

Baseline

Your Whistle device monitors drinking activity over time to create a baseline average for your dog.

When your dog deviates significantly from this average, these levels can help you recognize when something might be off.

Below Average

This is when your dog is in the lower 12.5% of their typical drinking time.

It’s useful to monitor drinking changes against changes in food, temperature, activity and lifestyle.

Average

“Average” drinking represents the middle range of your dog’s drinking habits.

Above Average

“Above Average” drinking represents the upper 12.5% of your dog’s drinking habits.

Increases in temperature and/or activity or changes in lifestyle and food can attribute to this increased drinking.

WHEN YOUR DOG’S DRINKING IS ABOVE AVERAGE

What to do: As an isolated event, increases or decreases in drinking habits are completely normal and nothing to worry about. However, when trends persist for several days, consider talking to a veterinarian to better understand why these changes might be occurring.

When your dog deviates significantly from their normal and goes into an above average or below average range, we’ll raise a flag and let you know that your dog’s drinking looks off. Being below or above average isn’t necessarily an indicator of a health issue, but it should be a prompt to pay closer attention to your dogs habits.

When using this feature, keep in mind that assigning levels to your dog’s drinking frequency is not designed to identify illness. This feature is designed to support your own observations into your dog’s habits, and provide data and perspective for a conversation with your vet.

SLEEPING

SLEEPING

Because not all sleep is created equal: Your dog’s sleeping patterns can uncover important insights about their health.

The quality of a dog’s nightly sleep—and specifically, the consistency (variation in hours) and continuity (number of disruptions)—is correlated with other measures of a dog’s wellness and can be one of the first clues that point towards sickness or injury. If your dog’s sleep patterns have changed without an explainable cause (new home, change in schedule, etc.), it may be worth taking a closer look at other aspects of your dog’s behavior.

UNDERSTANDING SLEEP LEVELS

Baseline

Your Whistle tracker monitors nighttime sleep over time to create a baseline for your dog. When your dog deviates significantly from this baseline, these levels can help you recognize when something might be off.

RESTFUL

This means your dog may be experiencing one or two more nighttime disruptions than is normal.

What to do: Notice your dog’s sleep behavior, and check to see if they might need a more comfortable environment or if any lifestyle changes such as food, location, or bed can be attributed to the change.

SLIGHTLY DISRUPTED

This means your dog may be experiencing one or two more nighttime disruptions than is normal.

What to do: Notice your dog’s sleep behavior, and check to see if they might need a more comfortable environment or if any lifestyle changes such as food, location, or bed can be attributed to the change.

SEVERELY DISRUPTED

This means your dog may be experiencing several more nighttime disruptions than normal, and sleep quality may be compromised. In our research, we found that dogs experiencing uncomfortable medical issues (like severe skin infections) experience significantly more disruptions than healthy dogs.

SLEEPING DURATION

Significant changes in nightly sleep patterns – both more sleep and less sleep – can be indicators of possible changes in well-being than the amount of time a dog sleeps each night. If your dog’s sleep patterns have changed and there is no explainable cause – such as new home, change in schedule, or stay at boarding – it may be worth taking a closer look at other aspects of your dog’s behavior.

Given the availability of midday rest for most dogs, getting fewer hours of nightly sleep is not inherently a problem; however, we did find that dogs experiencing severe skin infections and allergies got fewer hours of restful sleep than healthy dogs.

A significant increase or decrease in sleep hours from a dog’s baseline can point towards health changes.

Dogs’ sleep patterns also often closely mirror their owners’ habits, especially if a bed or bedroom is shared. Whistle’s wellness trends may even shed some light on your own sleep habits!

SLEEP DISRUPTIONS

Unprovoked sleep disruptions can be a sign of discomfort. Whistle scans your dog’s nightly sleep patterns for disturbances that don’t match regular sleep cycles. Whistle’s algorithms identify sleep disruptions as intervals between the bedtime and wake time in which a dog awakens and shows significant motion. To be considered a disruption, our sleep quality algorithm must detect that the dog is awake for multiple minutes and performing an action like itching, pacing, or repetitive posture changes.

Dogs have shorter sleep cycles than humans and go through sleep stages every 15 to 20 minutes, which often include small movements, fidgeting, re-positioning, and dreaming. Our algorithms are calibrated so that they do not count these short, low-energy movements as disruptions, as they are a normal part of a night’s rest.

There is no clear line between “normal” and “abnormal” sleep disturbances, so pet owners should consider their own context about their pet’s lifestyle in addition to the disruption information provided by Whistle.

Disruptions are not inherently bad or indicative of a problem. Many dogs have nightly sleep disruptions that are part of their normal routine, such as moving from the couch to the bed when their owner calls it a night.

We used the Pet Insight Project database of Whistle data and vet medical records to calibrate our algorithms so that most dogs evaluated as “healthy” had few detected disruptions, whereas dogs with veterinary-documented insomnia showed many disruptions.

Eating

Eating

Eating habits reveal more than a simple love of treats.

Eating levels are based on your dog’s personal eating habits. Every day, we map out when your dog eats, so you can identify both typical patterns and unexpected behaviors. For instance, you might notice that every time you stop for a pup cup, your dog skips dinner. Spot a change? That doesn’t necessarily mean there’s an issue. It’s just a sign to pay attention at mealtime (and maybe cut down on the extra treats.)

UNDERSTANDING EATING LEVELS

Baseline

Your smart device monitors eating activity over time to create a baseline average for your dog. When your dog deviates from their average, we’ll let you know so you can check in to see if there’s a potential issue.

Below Average

Your dog is eating less than usual.

What to do: Keep tracking for any decreases. And look for changes in food type, treat intake, and exercise.

Average

Your dog is eating normally.

What to do: Just keep tracking and doing what you’re doing.

Above Average

Your dog is eating more than usual.

What to do: Keep tracking for any increases. And look for changes in food type, treat intake, and exercise.

Worried about your dog’s eating

Keep monitoring their eating both with your smart device and your pet parent observational skills. A change doesn’t necessarily mean there’s an issue. It could be related to another change, like a new type of food, bowl, eating spot, or treat-loving friend. But if we do spot a change, try taking a closer look during mealtime.


If their eating levels stay too low or high, connect with your vet.

wellness

wellness

With 7 days of data, you can understand your dog’s wellness.

Your dog’s Wellness Score gives you a data-based assessment of their energy level and insight into their overall health. A high score shows your pup is getting enough exercise and feeling well. While a low score indicates they’re not—and that you should watch out for unexpected changes. Naturally, your dog’s day and your own activity affect how much energy they use every day. So look out for changes that could shift their score. Extra-long hikes could up it, while a missed walk on a rainy day could lower it.

UNDERSTANDING THEIR OVERALL WELLNESS

Baseline

Your smart device monitors the Wellness Score over time to create a baseline average for your dog. When your dog deviates from their average, we’ll let you know so you can check in to see if there’s a potential issue.

Excellent

Your dog is doing well.

What to do: Great job! Just keep tracking and doing what you’re doing.

Okay

Your dog is doing okay.

What to do: Keep tracking, and keep a close eye to see if they seem tired or are skipping exercise. Also, look out for potential causes for decreased activity, like being in the crate more than normal. And if it seems like they don’t feel well, talk with your vet.

Low

Your dog has a low score.

What to do: Keep tracking for any increases. And look for changes in food type, treat intake, and exercise.

Worried about your dog’s Wellness Score?

Watch your dog closely for signs they may be tired or not feeling like themselves, like dragging their feet at walk time or skipping their nightly tug-o-war session. And consider other factors that could lower their activity level, like extra crate time, a boarding vacation, or a few missed trips to the dog park. On top of your pet parent observational skills, keep monitoring their health and behavior with your smart device


If their Wellness Score stays low without a reasonable explanation, connect with your vet.

*Offer good thru 2/2. Excludes taxes and shipping.